Clinicians | Therapists | Psychologists | York, PA
Psychological Associates of Pennsylvania PC - York, PA

Real solutions for life's toughest issues

Millersville University

 

Professional Philosophy: Individuals experiencing ideal emotional health acknowledge fully their thoughts and feelings. This self-awareness fosters a wide variety of behavioral choices to cope with life’s challenges. The health of each individual can then support a couple’s relationship and ultimately the family.

 

Therapy of choice: A primary focus of mine is working with adults dealing with depression and anxiety symptoms. These issues are often complicated by life’s stress and adjustments. Healing the symptoms along with developing problem-solving strategies often go hand-in-hand to provide resolution and relief. “Happy families are all alike; every unhappy family is unhappy in its own way” opens Leo Tolstoy in Anna Karenina. This truthful quote also applies to couples and the complex issues in relationships. I have a special interest in providing couples with a safe place to understand each other’s thoughts, feelings and behaviors. A cornerstone of this work is learning and applying healthy communication skills to facilitate healing, resolution, and growth.

Ardis Featherman, M.S. Licensed Psychologist

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Frostburg State University

Certified Advanced Alcohol and Drug Counselor

 

Therapeutic Philosophy: I believe in an empathetic, non-judgmental, genuine counseling relationship. It takes time to develop trust in a counselor, but this type of relationship makes it easier.

 

I believe all people have the ability within to change and have already had some measure of success in addressing their problems on their own; my job is to help clients recognize the skills and abilities they already have. I focus a lot on recognizing where an individual's own power and control lie and in helping the client to focus his or her attention into those areas where their efforts will be most effective. For example - I can't change others, so why don't I change how I interact with them? How we view and interpret the world around us can sometimes be the root of our problems. This goes beyond whether you see the glass half-full or half-empty. We learn through our experiences and base our present interactions with the world on our past. For example, if someone is told they are bad, repeatedly throughout their early life, they may be prone to see present events more negatively. They may unconsciously come to believe they are bad on some level. My job is to help you explore how you might adjust your view of the world so that you can better manage the stressors of today. And finally, from an addictions counselor standpoint, I stress the need for structure, support, and daily recovery planning. Staying clean from alcohol and drugs is more than just going to meetings and changing people, places, and things. After all, if you get clean and sober, it's supposed to be worth it in the end. Right? So you need to not only develop a lifestyle that both supports and nurtures your commitment to recovery, but you need to develop one that creates interest, excitement, and entertainment.

Masters degree, Millersville University

Licensed marriage and family therapist, Temple University

 

Quote: “Insanity is doing the same thing over and over again and expecting different results.”

 

Therapy commitment: As a solution-focused therapist, my primary goal is to help individuals, couples, and families to focus on the present and the future, and to encourage them to take action in changing their long-standing repetitive and unhealthy cognitive, emotional, and behavioral patterns. While we can not change the past, we can work together to address current life challenges and find resolutions to a wide range of life changes and losses, adjustment difficulties, communication and relational problems, stress-related and coping issues, as well as other personal and daily living problems. The past is important since it has influenced us and brought us to where and who we are today. But we cannot allow it to determine our future. Together we will outline a personalized action plan to help you attain the personal growth and life goals you have been striving to achieve for a brighter and more fulfilling future.

MSW, University of Maryland at Baltimore

Certified in trauma treatment

 

Quote: "I've learned that people will forget what you said, people will forget what you did, but people will never forget how you made them feel." - Maya Angelou

 

Therapeutic philosophy: We live in a very complicated world. How we choose to play a major role in it stems from our own self-perceptions and core beliefs of how we view ourselves and our environments. As a licensed clinician certified in post-traumatic stress, I will utilize various cognitive and dialectical behavior techniques which will enable you to discover your own true identity in order to rebuild your life. I feel that it is important to understand how you can empower yourself to become a survivor of trauma rather than a victim. I am also working steadily with individuals in couples counseling, evaluating their weaknesses and strengths as a team. I utilize relationship skills centered around communication, trust and intimacy issues, in order to reflect ways to enhance your union as life companions. After thirteen years of working at the University Of Maryland Medical Center, Department of Psychiatry in the Outpatient Addictions Treatment Services Division, I have witnessed how imperative it is to assist a lost soul in finding his or her purpose in life without substance dependence. I will therapeutically guide you in healing your body, mind, and soul, in order to turn your life into a meaningful journey.

Types of clinicians

Eva H. Ciesielski, M.S., LMFT

Teri Gotti Szubinski, LCSW-C (Licensed Clinical Social Worker - Certified)

Keith French, Licensed Professional Counselor

Licensed Psychologist, Millersville University

 

Professional Philosophy: "Putting education, knowledge, and experience to work for you." The most important job of a psychologist is to empower people and provide them with skills to achieve their innermost wants, wishes, and desires.

 

Passions: My past and continuing education - combined with years of clinical experience and devotion to personal self-growth - have afforded me the opportunity to assist countless individuals take charge of their lives and to thrive. I am here to guide you in your creation of a positive path for your life.

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Licensed Psychologist, Millersville University

 

Professional Philosophy: I see myself as a motivator and educator. I encourage you to embrace the ideas of personal wellness, truth, and self care, and then teach you how to apply these ideas to your life. Therapy is a combination of healing old hurts, moving past them, and learning skills to make changes in your thinking and behavior that will improve your outlook and relationships.

 

Therapy of choice: I teach cognitive techniques to adults, children and teens to help them conquer anxiety and depression. These skills become a “bag of tricks” they will have at their disposal throughout their lifetimes. I am especially happy when a person who has been suffering tells me how much the techniques have helped him or her. I look at the whole person - diet, activity level, health/physical wellness, relationships, past experiences and future goals - when I evaluate an individual's needs and plan for treatment. I believe it is the combination of a number of therapies and lifestyle changes that makes the most positive impact on my clients’ personal successes and happiness.

Masters from Millersville University

 

Professional Philosophy: “You have come here to find what you already have.” - Buddhist Aphorism

 

Life presents challenges for each of us. We may find ourselves struggling with issues and difficulties that hinder us from enjoying a fulfilling life. My goal as a therapist is to promote your emotional well being by guiding you through these challenges, by using your strengths and untapped potential to take the necessary steps toward making healthy life changes.

Joan L. Bitzer, M.S.

James D. Spangler, M.S.

John R. Stevens, M.S.

Masters’ in Clinical Social Work, Licensed Clinical Social Worker

Bryn Mawr College Graduate School of Social Work

 

Quote: All I have to learn is within me...

 

Theraphy Commitment: My philosophy in working with people is encapsulated in the ancient Sanskrit expression; people possess far more knowledge, insight and awareness than they often know. My professional purpose is to provide the best therapeutic environment for their “learning” to unfold.

 

In my years of counseling I have had a wide range of training and experience with people of  all ages and with varied concerns and struggles. My experience and training includes children, families, couples and adults. While I utilize techniques from developmental psychology, psychodynamic therapy, cognitive-behavioral therapy and family systems therapy, my therapeutic style is strength-based, holistic, and client centered. Treatment is different for each person, as each person comes to counseling with unique experiences, goals and needs.

Laura Matthew Frie, MSS, LCSW

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OWNERS/THERAPISTS

CLINICIANS

Mansfield University - Clinical Psychology

 

Quote: "Shame happens when we look at past events and circumstances with judgement."

 

Therapy commitment:  Our heart is a lighthouse at the edge of an ocean of desire. Our head, our conscious mind, is a boat while our life happens on the surface.  Deep below, unconsciously and beyond awareness, lie skeletons programmed with messages of the past. Life can trigger these skeletons to float to the surface, bearing messages that we react to - not knowing why we do what we do. Rarely we choose; mostly, we impulsively react. When we mess up, we blame ourselves for making poor choices. Feeling guilty, we mistakenly believe we are stupid. Really we're just unaware; and thus, forgivable.

 

Hundreds of addictions play out on the surface where we try short-term fixes to avoid pain and/or seek pleasure.  Whatever we habitually do, they are all distractions, diversions, and painkillers to the reality that we're lost and dependent on self. We've not looked for the lighthouse nor have we plugged in our GPS. Our boat - our thinking mind - our self-will has no direction without the guidance of the heart. It matters not whether the heart is call intuition, moral compass, spiritual guidance, or God's will.  Unless and until we align our head with our heart, we will have no peace.

Mark Pentz, LPC

Mark Pentz